Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Balance Your Emotional Intelligence Skills


Having emotional intelligence, often referred to as EI, is an important part of being a stronger, more effective leader.

But too many people assume that it’s all about being sweet and chipper. Sure, some EI competencies are related to sociability, sensitivity, and likability, but others are connected to leadership skills like achievement, influence, and conflict management.

The key is to have a balance. If you’re strong in some of the softer, emotional skills, then focus on honing skills like giving unpleasant feedback.

For example, rather than using your EI to smooth over interactions with a coworker who is overbearing and abrasive, work on bringing up the issue to your colleague directly, drawing on conflict management to give direct feedback and on emotional self-control to keep your reactivity at bay.

Adapted from “Emotional Intelligence Has 12 Elements. Which Do You Need to Work On?” by Daniel Goleman and Richard E. Boyatzis

Monday, May 22, 2017

Use High Standards to Motivate Employees


Employees constantly watch their leaders to understand what kind of people they are.

So one of the most important things leaders can do is to insist on high standards. While low standards lead to low commitment, high standards are energizing, even for the most self-motivated employees.

But choose your arenas carefully. If you demand perfection in every aspect of performance, you’ll come across as a tyrannical nitpicker.

Choose one or two things you want to be known for, such as always being prepared for meetings, insisting on product quality, or supporting excellent customer service.

Whatever the standard is, consistently uphold it and demand it of others.

Adapted from “Followers Don’t See Their Leaders as Real People,” by Nathan T. Washburn and Benjamin Galvin